Neurofeedback News:
 

Autism

Assessment-Guided Neurofeedback for Autistic Spectrum Disorder
By: Robert Coben, PhD and Ilean Padolsky, PhD

In recent years, Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has shown a dramatic increase in prevalence. A review of prevalence survey research for ASD (identified by DSM-IV criteria for Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified) across the United States and the United Kingdom reported rates of ASD substantially increased from prior surveys indicating 5 to 10 per 10,000 children to as high as 50 to 80 per 10,000 (equivalent to a range of 1 in 200 to 1 in 125 children with ASD) (Blaxill, 2004). Another review of research on the epidemiology of Autism (Medical Research Council, 2001) indicated that approximately 60 per 10,000 children (equivalent to a range of 1 in 166 children) are diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder.
For more information, please click the following link:
Robert Coben, PhD & Ilean Padolsky, PhD, 2007

 


 

Connectivity-Guided Neurofeedback for Autistic Spectrum Disorder
By: Robert Coben,PhD

Research on autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) has shown related symptoms to be the result of brain dysfunction in multiple brain regions. Functional neuroimaging and electroencephalography research have shown this to be related to abnormal neural connectivity problems. The brains of individuals with ASD show both areas of excessively high connectivity and areas with deficient connectivity. This article reviews emerging evidence that neurofeedback guided by connectivity data can remediate these connectivity anomalies leading to symptom reduction and functional improvement. This evidence raises the hopes for a behavioral, psychophysiological intervention moderating the severity of ASD. Both empirical data and a case example are presented to exemplify this approach.
For more information, please click the following link:
http://clearmindcenter.com/Research/Autism/autism_connectivity_coben%202007.pdf

 


 

Positive Outcome With Neurofeedback Treatment In a Case of Mild Autism
By: Arthur G. Sichel, Lester G. Fehmi, and David M. Goldstein

This article looks at the experience of Frankie, an autistic 8 and 1/2 year old boy. He was diagnosed mildly autistic by several specialists. One specialist claimed he was brain damaged and "autistic-like " and that there was no hope for improvement. At Frankie's mother's request, neurotherapy diagnosis and treatment was begun. After 31 sessions, Frankie showed Positive changes in all the diagnostic dimensions defining autism in DSM-111-P, This has profound implications for treatment in a field with few low-risk alternatives.
For more information, please click the following link:
http://clearmindcenter.com/Research/Autism/autism_research%201995.pdf

 


 

School-Based Neurofeedback for Autistic Spectrum Disorder
By: Mark Darling

Neurofeedback is an intervention that is showing a lot of promise for people diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). While other childhood behaviour disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have been in the neurofeedback limelight for some years, it would appear that ASD is about to have its day in the sun. Recent research is showing that children with ASD are responding very well to both electroencephalographic (EEG) and haemoencephalographic (HEG) neurofeedback. Furthermore, our own research indicates that neurofeedback can be an effective schoolbased intervention for children in the autistic spectrum.
For more information, please click the following link:
Mark Darling, 2007

 


 

EEG Power and Coherence in Autistic Spectrum Disorder
By: Coben R, Clarke AR, Hudspeth W, Barry RJ

The results suggest dysfunctional integration of frontal and posterior brain regions in autistics along with a pattern of neural underconnectivity. This is consistent with other EEG, MRI and fMRI research suggesting that neural connectivity anomalies are a major deficit leading to autistic symptomatology.
For more information, please click the following link:
Coben, R et al, 2008

 


 

Neurofeedback Helps Those With Autistic Disorders, Study Finds
By: Science Daily

ScienceDaily (Feb. 28, 2008) — Research on autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) shows that neurofeedback (EEG biofeedback) can remediate anomalies in brain activation, leading to symptom reduction and functional improvement. This evidence raises the hopes for a behavioral, psychophysiological intervention moderating the severity of ASD. Read More

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